Tracking

March 24, 2001 to May 12, 2001

The CCAC Institute presents Tracking, an international exhibition of contemporary video work. Organized by CCAC Wattis Institute Director Ralph Rugoff, the exhibition features works that employ a specific cameratechnique⎯tracking, or dollying⎯borrowed from the vocabulary of filmmaking and reinterpreted in an installation context. In each piece a single, isolated camera moves through, over or around its subject, establishing an alternate sense of space. International in scope, the exhibition will include works by Darren Almond (Great Britain), Jessica Bronson (USA), Claude Closky (France), Thomas Demand (Germany), Zhu Jia (China), Sergio Prego (Spain) and Bojan Sarcevic (Slovenia).

In Darren Almond's projected video piece, Geisterbahn, the camera rides on the front of a ghost train as it winds along a track through dark corners and past eerie scenes in a Viennese haunted house. Jessica Bronson uses a helicopter to track the path of the Los Angeles riverbed in A Small Infinite. In her installation, different perspectives are mirrored within the frame of four monitors to create geometric forms from the moving landscape. Claude Closky's En Avant is a compilation of horror and action movie clips featuring shots that show the point of view of a rushing predator, assailant or vehicle. Thomas Demand's film, Tunnel, takes viewers on an endless claustrophobic journey through a dark tunnel reminiscent of the site where Princess Diana's fatal crash occured. For Zhu Jia's Forever, a camera was attached to the rotating wheel of a tricycle traveling through the streets of Beijing, giving the viewer a dizzying view of swirling vehicles and pedestrians. Rather than using a moving camera, Sergio Prego "tracks" his performances with a series of 40 individual cameras that record his leaps and paint splatters in fragmented slow motion, freezing movement in mid-air. In Irrigation-Fertilization, Bojan Sarcevic literally follows the tracks left by a mechanic as he wanders around his workshop, dripping a trail of liquid behind him.